Integrated, Inclusive and Efficient Solid Waste Management System in Bissau

N/A

Amount Raised

N/A

Total Investors

Project Overview

The project entails a variety of elements associated with waste collection and disposal in Bissau. First, the project will involve a community-based system of separation, collection, recycling, and disposal of solid waste is established in two districts, with community awareness-raising and capacity and job creation, especially for migrants and youth, with a financial structure that enables the long-term economic sustainability of the waste separation, collection, and recycling system is implemented. The proposal for a mobile application for solid waste management from cooperatives in connection with the city council and other actors will guarantee an integrated database for municipal solid waste management.

Second, a study on the value chain and marketing of reused or recycled products will be made and two established recycling initiatives will be considered.

Third, the installation of condominium sanitation approach in two districts to be selected.

Fourth, the rehabilitation of the Antula dumpsite should take place in order to prevent further erosion and landslide over the surrounding settlements, as well as its stabilization to prevent further collapse and methane gas explosion which is now at higher risk of occurrence with a larger impact to the surrounding residential area.

Finally, the on-the-ground experience provided by these different activities will inform a waste management strategy that will be developed for the city of Bissau.

Sectors

  • Waste Management
  • Water & Sanitation
  • Others (Slum Upgrading)
US$20,000,000
Funding Goal
Guinea-Bissau
Country
Africa
Region

Objectives

The scope and the objective are to establish an integrated, inclusive and efficient waste collection and disposal system in the cities of Bissau, accessible to citizens, and which promotes local employment and economic development, particularly among youth and migrants. This will build on the experience already implemented in Bissau as part of the cooperation between CMB and the EU, strengthening the aspects that worked (e.g. the creation of the cooperative), and with adjustments where difficulties were encountered (e.g. financial model). To contribute to the better sustainability of the project, synergies will be created between the current income generation projects involving returned migrants and youth in Bissau. Job creation for youth and for return migrants and vulnerable migrants is a strategy that IOM has adopted for the resilience and socio-economic sustainability of this portion of the population. Strengthening the social cohesion and integration of migrants has also been a focus of the process of reintegration of migrants into their own communities and inclusion of migrants in the country.

Progress Tracker

Phases

  • Phase 1

    In 2016, the Urban Solid Waste Management Project was initiated, a community-based program of waste separation and collection (with emphasis on 1st collection, as mentioned above), led by CMB with financial support from the European Union (EU). The initiative included the creation of a pilot cooperative (Cooperativa de Reciclagem de Lixo) to perform the service, initially in the neighbourhoods of Tchada and Bissau Velho, collecting waste from 60 families on average daily. According to consultations with both the CMB and the cooperative, the project has achieved relative success, particularly in the matter of waste separation and collection. However, difficulties were encountered in the awareness processes of the communities, and in the financial sustainability of the adopted model - two intrinsically associated problems, since the lack of understanding on the part of the residents decreased the fundraising for the operation of the initiative. The partnership was discontinued in 2017.

  • Phase 2

    Generation of waste according to SDG 12.5 and 12.3.1 is decreased while fostering sustainable consumption and community engagement.
    OP1.1 A primary collection system is set up in the target areas
    OP1.2 Job opportunities created, especially for migrants and youth

  • Phase 3

    Improved municipal solid waste collection and controlled management according to SDG 11.6.1
    OP2.1 Communities engaged and waste segregation at source established
    OP 2.2 Financial mechanisms to support the primary collection system put in place
    OP2.3 Mobile application for solid waste management from cooperatives in connection with the city council and other actors developed and utilized

  • Phase 4

    Recycling of suitable materials according to SDG 12.5.1 is increased
    OP3.1 Study on value chain and marketing of reused or recycled products conducted
    OP3.2 Two recycling initiatives established

  • Phase 5

    OC4. Health conditions are significantly improved in selected neighbourhoods by enhanced sanitation systems.
    OP4.1 Condominium sanitation approach installed, in two districts to be selected.

  • Phase 6

    Environmental and socioeconomic conditions of the communities directly and indirectly affected by the current inadequate waste disposal are improved.
    OP5.1 Antula dump site is rehabilitated to prevent further erosion and landslide over the surrounding settlements, as well as its stabilization to prevent further collapse and methane gas explosion which is now at higher risk of occurrence with larger impact to the surrounding residential area.

  • Phase 7

    Institutional framework on SWM is established in Bissau which allows for the scale up and replication of initiatives carried out as part of the project.
    OP6.1 Waste Wise Cities Tool (WaCT) is applied
    OP6.2 Integrated database for municipal solid waste management established
    OP6.3 Waste Management Strategy developed for the city of Bissau. Based on the outcomes of the WaCT application

Current Stage

Concept Stage

Timeline

Five years which will also envision the implementation of the ‘Fukuoka Method’ waste disposal.

Project Milestones

N/A

ESG Impact

Economic Development
• Waste collection and separation is carried out in an inclusive and economically sustainable manner, generating jobs for youth and migrants and potentially to the greater community.
• Reuse and recycling initiatives, as well as other waste disposal alternatives, are proposed and initiated in collaboration with other institutions which can corroborate with better practice for income generation.

Social and Environmental Impact
• Health conditions are significantly improved in selected neighbourhoods by enhanced sanitation systems
• Environmental and socioeconomic conditions of the communities directly and indirectly affected by the current inadequate waste disposal are improved

Governance
• Institutional framework on SWM is established in Bissau which allows for the scale up and replication of initiatives carried out as part of the project

Beneficiaries

• Two districts to be selected.
• Neighbourhoods surrounding Antula dumpsite.
• Youth, women and migrants will be prioritized to be part of the waste management teams.

In total, over 1 million (to be later specified once districts are selected)

SDG Goals

SDG 1: No PovertySDG 2: Zero HungerSDG 3: Good Health and Well-beingSDG 4: Quality EducationSDG 5: Gender EqualitySDG 6: Clean Water and SanitationSDG 7: Affordable and Clean EnergySDG 8: Decent Work and Economic GrowthSDG 9: Industry, Innovation and InfrastructureSDG 10: Reduced InequalitySDG 11: Sustainable Cities and CommunitiesSDG 12: Responsible Consumption and ProductionSDG 13: Climate ActionSDG 14: Life Below WaterSDG 15: Life on LandSDG 16: Peace and Justice Strong InstitutionsSDG 17: Partnerships to achieve the Goals

Rationale

SDG 3 – Health and well-being: Inadequate waste management is a risk factor to human and animal health, facilitating the proliferation of micro and macro vectors of diseases through vacant lots or dumps where waste accumulates, in addition to the risk of disease transmission associated with the food chain, when animals that feed at these sites are subsequently slaughtered. Hospital and health care waste, which is often toxic or radioactive, when improperly incinerated, causes emissions of noxious gases, endangering the health of the people involved in its treatment and the environment.

SDG 6 – Clean water and sanitation: Improper waste disposal contaminates water sources, clogs storm drains, and facilitates the multiplication of disease vectors that threaten the health of humans and animals.

SDG 8- Decent work and economic growth: Target 8.8 promotes protecting “[d]workers’ rights and promoting safe and secure work environments for all workers, including migrant workers, in particular migrant women, and people in precarious employment.”

SDG 11- Sustainable Cities and Communities: Significantly transforming the construction and management of urban spaces is key to achieving sustainable development. Target 11.6 specifically calls for reducing the negative environmental impact per capita of cities, including paying special attention to air quality, municipal waste management and more.

SDG 12 – Responsible Consumption and Production: Goal 12 can be achieved by substantially reducing waste generation through prevention, reduction, recycling, and reuse, both in consumption and production: Separate household waste and dispose of it properly; Address food waste and food loss, including post-harvest loss; Pursue environmentally sound management of chemicals throughout their life cycle, among others.

SDG 14 – Life in Water: Often uncollected waste ends up in streams or on vacant lots. Extending solid waste collection to the entire population and eliminating uncontrolled landfills can prevent waste (particularly plastics) from ending up in the oceans.

SDG 15 – Earth Life: Proper waste management and disposal, especially of chemical and hazardous waste, is essential to avoid soil contamination and consequently to maintain land quality and biodiversity. measures such as the use of sanitary landfills with proper slurry treatment and the reduction of final disposal of solid waste in the soil through selective collection, recycling and composting contribute to the protection of Earth life.

Risks and Limitations

What are the key risks, constraints and dependencies related to the project?

RISK/LEVEL OF RISK/STRATEGIES TO MITIGATE

Guinea-Bissau Government is working towards stability/ LOW Risk Political and institutional /Political dialogue reinforced by the implementation of a waste management system.

Guinea-Bissau has a lack of a national strategy for Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) /
LOW Institutional/ The creation of a committee at the ministerial and municipal level to elaborate a strategy of waste management to be replicated throughout the country

Non-compliance with its financial obligations by the State for the financing of operating costs for the waste management system/ HIGH political-institutional-financial/ Mobilization of actors at the highest level of the State through the ongoing political dialogue within the framework of budget support.

Bissau fails to work together harmoniously to manage the collection and operate the waste management system/ MEDIUM Institutional /Creation of a municipality network/cooperation/partnership in Bissau to enhance communication and know-how.

Difficulty in setting up recycling plant that are profitable and capable of processing large quantities of waste/
MEDIUM Social/ Focus on two priorities of recycling (composting / plastics) / generating income.

Lack of technical capacity at the state level (Bissau city government) to ensure the functioning of the implemented waste management system/ LOW Institutional/ Promoting the capacity building of the technical staff in charge of waste management at the city government level.

Lack of understanding and refusal of the population with regard to the behavioral changes that are requested of them to improve the collection of household waste/ HIGH Social/ Supporting measures of sensitization, changing behaviors of the stakeholders through the help of civil society and local communities and neighborhoods. Targeting schools to start a change in children’s behavior and targeting women and girls who are in charge of household chores.

The service is not accessible to all. The service subscription is too high/ LOW Social – Financial /The polluter pays principle must be applied to make the service viable and sustainable (not our case maybe).
Subscriptions must be adapted so that people in the most vulnerable situations/areas can access the service.

Risk of fraud and corruption in the use of funds/ MEDIUM Financial/ Dialogue with civil society, control bodies;
– carrying out audits and monitoring mechanisms – Preparation of guidelines on the management of public contracts.

 

Risk mitigation and continuity

1. Guinea-Bissau Government is working towards stability (Low / Political and Institutional): Political dialogue reinforced by the implementation of a waste management system.
2. Guinea-Bissau has a lack of a national strategy for Municipal Solid Waste Management (MSWM) (Low / Institutional): The creation of a committee at ministerial and municipal level to elaborate a strategy of waste management to be replicate throughout the country.
3. Non-compliance with its financial obligations by the State for the financing of operating costs for the waste management system (High / Political Institutional / Financial): Mobilization of actors at the highest level of the State through the ongoing political dialogue within the framework of budget support.
4. Bissau fails to work together harmoniously to manage collection and operate the waste management system (Medium / Institutional): Creation of a municipality network/cooperation/partnership IN Bissau to enhance communication and know how.
5. Lack of technical capacity at the state level (Bissau city government) to ensure the functioning of the implemented waste management system (Low / Institutional): Promoting capacity building of the technical staff in charge for waste management at the city government level.

Financing

Funding Goal

US$20,000,000

Type of Investment

Grant. The necessary support mainly revolves around the structuring of a sustainable financial model for the project (Development of Business Case, Investment Finance, Project Structuring (and PPP)), since this is an element that was identified as a main gap in the previous initiatives implemented in the country.

Financing Structure

Public Private Partnership

Secured Investment

US$50,000 from UN-Habitat includes the one-year background work realized in the conception of the project from its early stage aka 'sweat equity'. The European Union project mentioned in previous questions, which serves a background for this current proposal, had a total budget of EUR 556,999.

Committed Government Funding

N/A

Committed Private Funding

N/A

Support

Technical Support Required

As per described above, after the concept phase, the feasibility stage and advanced design stage will follow. In order to transform into a deliverable reality, learning from the previous project implemented in the field of waste management must be greatly considered: work in awareness campaigns for the community to become a backbone of the entire project and thus, finding self-sustaining economic activities within the waste management project.

Stakeholders

Governmental Buy-in

At the local level for Bissau, the city of Bissau has approved its own waste management regulation. However, that does not include recyclability regulations yet. In the Preamble, it is stated that for the effective application of the rules defined by the regulation, it will be necessary to reinforce municipality’s (CMB) control powers over subjects who can perform activities related to solid waste management or public hygiene and cleaning, in addition to introducing a new system of taxation and sanctions. Article I, for example, clarifies the scope of the regulation, stating in paragraph 1 that “This regulation defines the system adopted by the Municipality of Bissau for the management of urban solid waste (MSW), public hygiene and cleaning (sanitation) in its area of jurisdiction”.

Moreover, the city of Bissau is the only one in the country with a structure that includes a specific department assigned to waste management and sanitation. This topic has repeatedly been identified by the municipality as a priority and is reflected as such in the Bissau 2030 Strategic Framework.

Other Forms of Governmental Support

The government will provide indirect funding through technical support, availability of time and space for the project to take place.

National Ministries Involved

N/A

SubNational Ministries Involved

N/A

Other Entities Involved

N/A

Licenses and Permits


Not applicable at this stage.

Updates

Supporting Documents

No supporting documents included.

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